Tag Archives: Ethics and Integrity

The plank in our own eye

This entry is part 9 of 10 in the series What's the church's solution?.

Jesus said that we need to look at the sin in our own lives rather than look to the sin in others. We used to do this well, because as David Smith notes in his blog, the majority of letters found in the New Testament are in-house discussions with the saints of the church about their bad behaviours! Smith says we’re not so good today at that kind of discussion, but we’re very good at tossing bombs over the fence at our neighbours. More

Making peace with your team leader

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Conflict Resolution.

Christians should be very good at resolving conflicts because ours is a religion of reconciled relationships. Christianity is a religion of peace, with God and with each other. “Blessed are the peacemakers” is what Jesus said. However, conflicts can be challenging to resolve when there is a power differential between the parties, such as in the work environment between a team member and a team leader. So here are some suggestions to team members who may feel there is nothing they can do. More

The unapologetic apology: Saying “I’m sorry” well

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Conflict Resolution.

I find it annoying when someone says, “I’m sorry if I offended anyone.” That’s no apology! They’re only sorry that someone took offense! In other words, the person who took offense has the problem, not the one who caused the offense. If no one was offended, the offender wouldn’t feel the need to apologize at all. More

The dark side of leadership

The traits that enabled you to become a leader are the same traits that can be your downfall. This is the dark side of leadership. The point is not that leaders have a dark side that others don’t. Everyone has a dark side, but when you are in leadership, particularly in the senior leader’s role, your dark side has the potential to wreak greater havoc than would be the case with most people simply because you have greater ability to affect people. As you rise through the leadership ranks acquiring more power and authority that you plan to use for good, your foibles from the dark side are also acquiring greater power to potentially do serious harm to yourself and others. More