Bussey Quoted in Canadian Catholic News on Jobs funding

In a piece by Deborah Gyapong, Canadian Catholic News, Canadian Council of Christian Charities, Director of Legal Affairs, Barry W. Bussey was interviewed about the administration of the Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) grants after it was revealed 403 groups were refused funding.

Some 403 applications out of the 39,933 were “deemed ineligible for the funding under new rules that say the money cannot be used to undermine human rights,” according to Joanna Smith of the Canadian Press.

“The problem with the government approach with respect to the Canada Summer Jobs program is that it seeks to penalize religious organizations for doing what they are lawfully permitted to do, and that is to abide by the human rights legislation,” Bussey was quoted as saying.

 “The human rights legislation is there to allow greater diversity and pluralism in Canada,” he said. “However, the government approach is there is only one view of the world and if religious communities are out of line with the government view, they are unable to access funding everyone else has access to.”

“These are organizations that are there in community,” said Bussey. “People voluntarily show up on their doorstep and request their help. To say they are somehow imposing on someone else, that simply flies in the face of reality that they are providing for the material needs of these young moms who need help.”

Bussey said a number of members of the CCCC who applied for grants “were asked by the government to supply the government with copies of their various hiring policies and so forth.”

“It comes back to (the government’s) preoccupation with ‘Charter values’ over and against enumerated rights in the Charter such as religious freedom, freedom of association and freedom of conscience,” he said. 

Read the entire article here: Jobs funding refusals worry advocates

Thoughts on Bussey Quoted in Canadian Catholic News on Jobs funding

    1. Barry W. BusseyBarry W. Bussey Post author

      Thanks for your note. Yes, and for this reason there are a number of court cases challenging the government’s position. We have not heard the end of this.

      Reply
      1. Andre Delage

        I recommend that you challenge the Canadian Human Rights Act. It is unconstitutional. Nowhere in the Constitution Act, 1982(1) SCHEDULE B, CONSTITUTION ACT, does the Canadian Charter of Right and Freedoms recognized the Canadian Human Rights Act. Canadian Human Rights Act is mention nowhere in the ‘Schedule to the Constitution Act, 1982, Modernization of the Constitution. The Charter is entrenched by LAW in the Constitution of Canada, therefore unmovable, as for the Canadian Human Rights Act, however, is simply a piece of federal legislation, which may be repealed or revised by a simple majority vote in the federal House of Commons. In simple language, the federal government installed a window blind in front of the Constitution so that average Canadian in particularly Christians wouldn’t have access to the light (the truth).

        The Prime Minister of Canada has the supreme authority to govern the country of Canada. He can legislate any unlimited law without interferences and any obstructions from any oppositions. The Prime Minister of Canada is more powerful than the President of the United States of America. The President of the United States of America to legislate any new law, the President required the approval of the House of Representative and the Senate. Without the House of Representatives and of the Senate’s approval, the President is idle, dead in the water.

        As long that The Prime Minister of Canada has the majority in the House of Common’s and that his Party Member’s of Parliament gives their full support, the Prime Minister of Canada reigns supreme. There is no stopping him, not even the Senate, as long as the partisan senators are in majority. The only obstacle that could have got in the way was the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Yet, through time and multiple deceptions, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms has become a weak archaic document, unreachable for the average Canadian. A Charter made simple to read and to understand has become complicated, complex, elusive by the manipulation of a certain group of elites.

        Jordon Peterson stated that “The faster the Ontario Human Right Commission is abolished, the better. There isn’t a more dangerous organization in Canada, with the possible exception of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education”
        Please read my blog at https://www.simplicityinthegospel.com/2019/02/canadian-charter-of-rights-and-freedoms.html

        Reply

Leave a Reply to Andre Delage Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *